Can a promise made in life, be kept after death?

   

Losing a loved one is the most difficult, heartbreaking, mind-numbing event we humans go through in our lifetimes.

But if you are open minded — here in this plane as well as on the other side — miracles can happen.

Less than one year ago, Jules “Wild Bill” McNiss, of Deepwater, was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer.

McNiss, loving father of Mellie De Vault — investigator with Jersey Unique Minds Paranormal Society and on-air personality with Paradelphia Radio — lost his battle with this horrible disease on May 22 surrounded by his daughter, his wife Anna, his son Jay, and close family friends.

Like his daughter, McNiss was interested in the paranormal and believed spirits could return to this realm to visit after passing over.

Just a couple months ago, Mellie had a discussion with her dad that not many people have with their terminal parent.

While sitting outside on a warm spring day, she asked him if he would contact her after he passed over.

“I said, I know this is a touchy subject, but I want you to think of something, and really think about it, and come up with something you’ll be able to manipulate so you can communicate with me and let me know your OK.” Mellie explained.

He flashed his playful grin — he was probably thinking of ways to startle her like he always did — but he assured her he would attempt to make contact.

Some spirits leave money, others watch through doll's eyes | Paranormal Corner

Some spirits leave money, others watch through doll’s eyes 

Jersey Unique Minds Paranormal Society recently investigated two very different hauntings.

As the next few months passed, McNiss fought tooth and nail against the cancer.

But finally, it was time for him to move on.

Just hours before his body gave up, while reclined comfortably in a hospital chair, Mellie knelt beside her father and whispered into his ear so no one else could hear what she was saying.

“Dad, I know you can hear me,” she began. “Remember our deal? Remember you said you are going to try to communicate with me, right?”

In his weakened state, McNiss undeniably nodded his head, indicating he indeed did remember their deal, and would do his best to let his daughter know he is around even after his body is cremated.

Just a short time later, McNiss took his final breath and made the journey to the other side.

But it seems that it didn’t take him long to figure out how to let people know he is still around.

Just minutes after McNiss was pronounced dead, a family friend was walking out of the hospital room. She stopped to get Mellie’s attention.

“She said, ‘Look,’ and pointed at the floor,” Mellie said.

There, on the floor in the middle of the doorway was a 1994 penny tails up.

The hospital floor tiles are white and we had all been in and out throughout the evening — myself included. There was not a penny there until that moment.

“I started laughing and yelling ‘Yes!,'” Mellie said. “My father had literally just passed away. The nurses must have thought I was crazy.”

As if that wasn’t enough, on the morning of McNiss’ funeral, the family experienced something that could only be the work of his lingering spirit.

In his home, on the wall next to the chair where he spent the majority of his time during his final days, hangs a shelf covered in Native American figurines.

Ever since his best friend passed away many years ago, a certain Indian would turn to face the left. No matter how many times McNiss or his wife would turn it straight, it would always go back to facing sideways.

Being paranormal enthusiasts, they debunked vibration or air current manipulating the statuette a long time ago, and chalked up the movement to McNiss’ deceased friend.

On the morning of May 27, Anna McNiss found the Indian Chief figure, which normally stands on the same shelf with the mysterious moving piece, placed on the table beside her husband’s chair.

If it had fallen, it would have broken or at least landed on its side.

With the history of the moving Indian figure, Mellie feels that was her father’s definitive way of saying, “Hey, I’m here.”

Those are just two of the signs “Wild Bill” has already given us, and something tells me there will be many, many more.

Kelly Roncace is a senior investigator and team leader with Jersey Unique Minds Paranormal Society, a professional paranormal investigation team based in Salem County. Do you know of a haunted location that JUMPS could research and investigate? Contact Kelly at kroncace@njadvancemedia.com and follow her on Twitter @KellyRoncace with your suggestions.